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#4

Posted on: May 8, 2009

http://video.aol.com/video-detail/cheerios-ad-makes-men-look-weak/1162900852

             This is a video clip of a Cheerios ad along with news commentary. The ad breaks stereotypical beliefs of male control and male intelligence. Here, the wife has control of the conversation and while doing so she proves her intelligence to her husband at the cost of his stupidity. This commercial breaks both stereotypical masculine and feminine genderlects. Instead of the man using a competitive speech style the woman does to prove her point. The wife also communicates dominance in the conversation because she is already knowledgeable on the subject. She also is strictly focused on the content of the conversation even if it makes her husband look dumb. The husband is portrays the feminine genderlect of being highly responsive, because he is always asking questions or trying to point out a new already known fact. (Gamble & Gamble, 76)

Gamble, T. K., Gamble, M. W. (2003). The gender communication connection. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.

#5

Posted on: May 8, 2009

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Here is a picture of Rihanna breaking gendered stereotypes when it comes to clothing. She is wearing a suit-like outfit. The idea of a suit usually represents a male persona and with Rihanna wearing it, she is breaking the norm. Though it is more acceptable for women to wear clothing outside the norm, Rihanna is still breaking the stereotypical norm. A woman wearing a suit is usually for the work place, but Rihanna is using it for a red carpet event. Maybe she is doing this to show her celebrity power?

               At one point in time many women used to wear suit jackets in the work place. Women felt   “suit jackets once provided women with an office uniform” (Gamble & Gamble, 105). This feeling is no longer true. It is believed that the higher up a woman is, the more diverse she can be with her clothing choices.

Gamble, T. K., Gamble, M. W. (2003). The gender communication connection. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.  

Rihanna rocks the costume institute gala red carpet. (May 2009). Retrieved May 6, 2009, fromhttp://www.celebrity-gossip.net/celebrities/hollywood/rihanna-rocks-the-costume-institute-gala-red-carpet-213129/

#6

Posted on: May 8, 2009

hockey-fight

              This picture is of a fight during a hockey game. This scene is not uncommon for spectators of the sport, it is actually encouraged. Hockey is one sport in which fighting is promoted in. Here, the players show the ruthlessness they have and the express the idea “fight to the death.”

                Fighting in male sports is believed to promote gender identities. It is thought that “violent sport appears to be a male response to social changes that are undermining the traditional patriarchal power bases in men” (Gamble & Gamble, 313). One possible reason for the fight could be because one of the men was “talking smack,” which could lead to one overstepping their boundaries. This type of situation would make males want to prove their dominance and violence is their answer.

Gamble, T. K., Gamble, M. W. (2003). The gender communication connection. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.

#7

Posted on: May 8, 2009

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               This is a picture of a Swifter Wet Jet Mop ad. Even though it does not show the woman’s face, it is obvious that the user of the mop is a woman from the clothes and body type. The use of a woman in a cleaning ad is very stereotypical and reinforces that idea that women are to do the majority of the household chores.

                When compared to men “women average twenty-six hours per week in a house-hold labor” whereas men “average ten hours a week in household labor” (Gamble & Gamble, 204). Ads such as this not only reinforce the idea of women doing house-hold chores, but also that of women completing tedious chores. Gamble & Gamble also note the fact that “women serve as kitchen and bathroom product representatives” (353). It is clear that this woman is a representative for Swifter.

Gamble, T. K., Gamble, M. W. (2003). The gender communication connection. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.

 Richford, N., (2007, April). Swiffer WetJet: one mop you can’t do without. Associated Content.

#8

Posted on: May 8, 2009

           As I look back at my relationship with my ex-boyfriend, I can see many steps of the Knapp and Vangelisti’s Ten-Stage Model of Relationship, as well many steps we did not take. Sean and I were high school sweethearts and continued dating when he left for college. (He graduated before me) I can remember the first time we hung out, I was interested in his best friend, but then Sean kept asking me to hang out. Our initiating stage wasn’t a typical one, but it was still introducing us to each other. When Sean and I were in the experimenting stage, I remember being so shocked that him and I had so much in common. Sean and I did enter the intensifying stage and said I love you and we entered the integrating stage to a certain level. Our friends would always assume that inviting one of us meant you were inviting the both of us. We obviously did not enter the bonding stage, but when Sean left for college our relationship started to deteriorate. When it came to the coming apart section Sean and I entered the stages of circumscribing and stagnating, which eventually lead to the termination of our relationship. It was interesting to see a model of how most relationships then to take a look at my own.( Gamble & Gamble, 169)

Gamble, T. K., Gamble, M. W. (2003). The gender communication connection. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.

#9

Posted on: May 8, 2009

“Yeah, with all of these men linein’ up to get neutered

 it’s hip now to be feminized.

But I don’t highlight my hair, I’ve still got a pair.

Yeah, honey I’m still a guy.

Oh my eyebrows ain’t plucked there’s a gun in my truck.

Oh thank god, I’m still a guy.

 

                These lyrics come from Brad Paisley’s song “I’m still a guy.” Throughout the song Paisley sings about how even though he may try different things for his lover, in the end he’s still a guy. He depicts all the male-stereotypical activities he does. For example, be carries a gun in his truck and he does not highlight his hair. He even talks about his private area, noting that he has a pair, showing his masculinity and independence.

                Typical male language is that of one where males show their independence and is activity oriented. In the song Paisley describes the many manly activities he involves himself in and proves his independence. Paisley seems to enjoy the fact that he’s in control of his life and no one can change him or make him do things he does not wish to do.

Gamble, T. K., Gamble, M. W. (2003). The gender communication connection. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.     

Paisley, B. (2008). I’m still a guy. 5th Gear [CD]. Nashville: Artista Nashville.

#10

Posted on: May 8, 2009

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               Above is a picture of Maggie Fitzgerald, played by Hilary Swank, and her trainer Frankie Dunn, played by Clint Eastwood. This picture depicts Fitzgerald in the middle of a fight, ring side getting words of advice from her trainer. Here, Swank is playing a character that does not compete in a stereotypical role of a woman. Boxing is generally seen as a male sport, but Swanks character is breaking this ideal by becoming a boxer and following a stereotypical depiction on women in film.

                Usually “women are typically depicted in films as victims, powerless or dependent on men, involved in/consumed by relationships, or as nurturers who are focused on family, preoccupied with housework and believe they need a man to complete them”(Gamble & Gamble, 368).  Swank defies the stereotype of women being victims or powerless. When one can fight or box, they are no longer powerless or as easily able to be victimized.

Eastwood, C., (Director). (2004). Million dollar baby [Motion Picture]. United States: Warner Bros.

Gamble, T. K., Gamble, M. W. (2003). The gender communication connection. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.